Bloggers are a dying breed?!

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I’ve recently been going through my list of followers and popping in on their websites just to see what they’re up to. It started out pretty good at first. I got to see lots of really beautiful sites and read some really fantastic writing. I highly recommend this one,  https://inkowlme.wordpress.com   the pictures and writing are so wonderful.

0813161358-01But slowly, one by one, something started marring my fun filled journey through my followers worlds. No, it wasn’t typos. It was the “Website could not be found” screen. Over and over again that nasty page kept popping up. After getting thoroughly annoyed, I decided to do a little investigating, and WordPress was right. These websites really were shut down. My follower’s blogs were dead. Dead! And I didn’t even get an invitation to the funeral.

I just can’t believe it, a blog is there one minute and gone the next. A blog’s life is so fragile, so fleeting!

To all the bloggers out there. After your blogs untimely demise, please remember to let loved ones in the blogging community know so they have the opportunity to mourn your blog’s passing. Maybe send a nice e-card. big thank you

Writers of a different league

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I was recently reading an older issue of Writer’s Digest and I happened upon the article “Short Stories Big Rewards”. It was a pretty informative piece, so if you can find a copy of Writer’s Digest: Writer’s Yearbook 2017, I highly recommend it. But the part that I latched onto and couldn’t seem to let go, wasn’t really about the short writing format, or even how to use short stories to boost your writing career, it was the couple paragraphs mentioning Hugh Howey.

Of course, I’ve heard of him before and his famous “Wool” book, but what I hadn’t heard was the story behind the publishing of his book. According to the article Howey said, “That’s it . . . I made the work available and did zero promotion for it.”

Seriously?!

book shelf 2He just plopped his book onto Amazon Kindle and he’s insta-famous?! How on Earth is that fair? I slave over my books. I spend hours just plotting new ways to get the word out about my writing, and I get nowhere. Howey put his work out there and walks away and the reading world pounces on it like a half starved cougar.

And then a sneaking suspicion crept into my thoughts and I realized I’d had this same experience before. Back when I was studying for my Fine Arts degree, I remember meeting people like Howey.

In my studio art classes I did pretty well. Well enough to get good grades. I demonstrated the techniques taught and I used them as they were supposed to be used. My paintings and drawing were very correct. They were good, but not great. But every class had at least one student who’s work was truly great. It didn’t matter what they were painting, every brush stroke was mesmerizing. No matter how hard I studied or practiced, I could never match these students . Even with all my skills, there was always something my paintings lacked. The difference between them and me was a difference between skill and talent. Skill can make you correct, but it can never make you great. img_0235

I have a funny feeling that Howey has some serious talent, and unfortunately there isn’t any writing manual for that.

Writer in waiting

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To wait or not to wait, that is the question.

Finally, I’m coming up to the end of writing my fourth book My Bloody Revenge! and I really want to edit it right away. The only problem is I already know I do a much better job editing if I wait for a while first. In fact, the longer I wait the better I seem to do editing my own writing. A great example of that is my book It’s a stony road through Hell, I actually wrote the book years ago. I didn’t rediscover my old story until recently, and then a few months ago I edited it and published it. And hands down, it’s the best edit job I’ve ever done on my own writing.

img_0235When I compare my earlier books (that I didn’t wait to edit) to “ISRTH”, the difference is so obvious. After editing It’s a stony road through Hell, the plot was really clear, the main character had personality without being over the top, and the imagery supported the emotional environment of the main character really well. When I was done editing ISRTH, I read through my manuscript and thought, “Yep, that’s the story I wanted to tell.”

My earlier books were edited pretty good, but It’s a stony road through Hell was edited so much better.

I know that my work really shines when I give it time to age and polish it, but waiting is so hard! I want to see my books published right now. I want to share my stories while I’m still excited about them.

Does anyone have a tip or suggestion on how to not edit your book when your fingers are justa itchin’ for some editin’? If you do, please leave them in the comments area below!